July202014

jtotheizzoe:

Mars, Mapped 

The USGS has just released a gorgeous new geologic map of Mars, combining data from four separate spacecraft to paint a rainbow-like spectrum of terrain and texture upon the red planet.

See those four bulges on the left side of the spherical projection? Each of those four mountains, Olympus Mons, Ascraeus Mons, Arsia Mons, and Pavonis Mons, are taller than any mountain on Earth, including Mauna Kea (which rises more than six miles from the ocean floor).

Learn more at Wired’s MapLab blog, and view the incredible high-res annotated version at the USGS website

(via cabinet-de-curiosites)

July192014
nemfrog:

A map of Mars purporting to show the planet’s oceans and land masses. 1884.

nemfrog:

A map of Mars purporting to show the planet’s oceans and land masses. 1884.

(via cabinet-de-curiosites)

July142014
“We have to learn to write fiction, but we have already, to varying degrees, had to learn to read it. And I felt like quite a good reader of fiction, when I began to write fiction, or at least a good reader of that fiction which I most keenly enjoyed. And thus are we shape as writers, I believe, not so much by who our favorite writers are as by our general experience of fiction. Learning to write fiction, we learn to listen for our own acquired sense of what feels right, based on the totality of the pleasure (or its lack) that fiction had provided us. Not direct emulation, but rather a matter of a personal micro-culture.” William Gibson (via youmightfindyourself)
July62014
May182014

fidius:

catsbeaversandducks:

Cat Missing Since Japan Tsunami Reunited With Family After Three Years

A cat that went missing over three years ago during the 2011 tsunami disaster in Japan, has been reunited with his family. On Friday last week, a couple, both in their 60s, from Ofunato City, who thought their cat, Suika, would never come back, was overjoyed with the news.

The cat was found in the forest in Rikuzentaka City about 9.3 miles (15km) from their home. The rescuers took the kitty to an animal shelter in Ofunato City on April 10. At the time, none of them knew that the cat they found had been missing for over three years.

They decided to take photos of the cat and put them in a local newspaper to help the cat find his owners. It was then they discovered the family and their phone number written on the cat’s collar. They immediately contacted the owners to tell them the news.

Suika the cat was a rescue that the couple’s eldest son found and brought home 15 years ago. He became the perfect companion to the couple and they loved him to bits.

No one knows the adventures that Suika had in the time since he was missing, but nothing makes the couple happier than seeing their beloved cat return home safe.

Via Love Meow

My next children’s book, A Cat Named Watermelon.

May12014
lucienballard:

Doggerland.
A map showing Doggerland, a region of northwest Europe home to Mesolithic people before sea level rose to inundate this area and create the Europe we are familiar with today.
Map via National Geographic magazine.

lucienballard:

Doggerland.

A map showing Doggerland, a region of northwest Europe home to Mesolithic people before sea level rose to inundate this area and create the Europe we are familiar with today.

Map via National Geographic magazine.

(via cabinet-de-curiosites)

March272014
“All your poems are in a sense one poem.” Robert Lowell (via theparisreview)
March262014
“The cultivation of aptitude, far more than coincidence or inspiration, is responsible for most creative breakthroughs.” Debunking the mythology of creativity – a must-read. (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

8AM
theparisreview:

“The most important thing I’ve learned about writing is never write too much at a time,” Hemingway said, tapping my arm with his finger. “Never pump yourself dry. Leave a little for the next day. The main thing is to know when to stop. Don’t wait till you’ve written yourself out. When you’re still going good and you come to an interesting place and you know what’s going to happen next, that’s the time to stop. Then leave it alone and don’t think about it; let your subconscious mind do the work. The next morning, when you’ve had a good sleep and you’re feeling fresh, rewrite what you wrote the day before. When you come to the interesting place and you know what is going to happen next, go on from there and stop at another high point of interest. That way, when you get through, your stuff is full of interesting places and when you write a novel you never get stuck and you make it interesting as you go along.”
A reading list Ernest Hemingway created for a young writer in 1934.
The reading list:
The Blue Hotel by Stephen Crane
The Open Boat by Stephen Crane
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
Dubliners by James Joyce
The Red and the Black by Stendhal
Of Human Bondage by Somerset Maugham
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann
Hail and Farewell by George Moore
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
The Oxford Book of English Verse
The Enormous Room by E. E. Cummings
Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Far Away and Long Ago by W. H. Hudson
The American by Henry James

theparisreview:

“The most important thing I’ve learned about writing is never write too much at a time,” Hemingway said, tapping my arm with his finger. “Never pump yourself dry. Leave a little for the next day. The main thing is to know when to stop. Don’t wait till you’ve written yourself out. When you’re still going good and you come to an interesting place and you know what’s going to happen next, that’s the time to stop. Then leave it alone and don’t think about it; let your subconscious mind do the work. The next morning, when you’ve had a good sleep and you’re feeling fresh, rewrite what you wrote the day before. When you come to the interesting place and you know what is going to happen next, go on from there and stop at another high point of interest. That way, when you get through, your stuff is full of interesting places and when you write a novel you never get stuck and you make it interesting as you go along.”

A reading list Ernest Hemingway created for a young writer in 1934.

The reading list:

  • The Blue Hotel by Stephen Crane
  • The Open Boat by Stephen Crane
  • Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
  • Dubliners by James Joyce
  • The Red and the Black by Stendhal
  • Of Human Bondage by Somerset Maugham
  • Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  • War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
  • Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann
  • Hail and Farewell by George Moore
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • The Oxford Book of English Verse
  • The Enormous Room by E. E. Cummings
  • Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
  • Far Away and Long Ago by W. H. Hudson
  • The American by Henry James
March252014
natgeofound:

View of the Palace of Maharaja’s pond from the Island of the Sultans in Udaipur, India, 1923.Photograph by Jules Gervais Courtellemont, National Geographic

natgeofound:

View of the Palace of Maharaja’s pond from the Island of the Sultans in Udaipur, India, 1923.
Photograph by Jules Gervais Courtellemont, National Geographic

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